Nangchen Adeu Rinpoche

The 8th Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche was born on the 4th day of the 12th Tibetan month in the Iron Horse year of the 15th calendrical cycle (1930), in the middle of a freezing winter. Despite the prevailing weather conditions, at his birth, several miraculous signs appeared; blossoming flowers, repeated sounds of thunder, multiple appearances of rainbows, and water at Rinpoche’s home turning into milk.

As the 16th Karmapa and the 8th Drukpa Choegon Rinpoche recognized the child as the authentic reincarnation of the 7th Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche, he was taken to Tsechu Gompa for enthronement at the age of seven. Immediately after this, he began his traditional education in writing, calligraphy, poetry, astrology, mandala painting, spiritual practice and text recitation. At the same time, the young Adeu Rinpoche also received many teachings and pith-instructions based on the old and new traditions, but primarily on the Drukpa Lineage from the 8th Drukpa Choegon Rinpoche, Jamyang Khyentse Chökyi Lodrö and many other great masters.

After this, Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche entered into a seven-year retreat, during which he practiced the sadhanas of different deities and trained in tsa-lung, following the Six Yogas of Naropa and the liberating Mahamudra mind-training practices. He also learnt philosophy. Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche later wrote a precise commentary on the three sets of vows, the root of heart-essence of Nyingmapa lineage, and on the various mandala deities.

During the political upheaval in 1958, all the sacred texts, statues and precious objects were completely destroyed, and Rinpoche was imprisoned for 15 years. Although Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche suffered a great deal, the period in prison gave him an opportunity to meet many accomplished masters, who had also been imprisoned, especially Lama Rinchen and Khenpo Munsel from whom he received instructions on Dzogchen, and under whose guidance, he practiced the rare and precious teachings of the aural lineage (Nyengyü) of the Nyingma school, and studied the various Nyingmapa terma teachings.

Trushik Adeu Rinpoche was an extremely important master of the Drukpa Lineage, especially following the Cultural Revolution, during which many great Drukpa Lineage masters passed away. When teachings of the Khampa tradition of the Drukpa Lineage were faced with threats of extinction, Rinpoche was its only remaining lineage holder.

At the end of 1980, Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche went to Tashi Jong in India to pass on the entire lineage of the Khampa Drukpa tradition to the present Gyalwa Dokhampa Shedrub Nyima, Drukpa Choegon Rinpoche Thutop Chokyi Wangchuk, Dorzong Rinpoche, Drugu Choegyal Rinpoche, Zigar Rinpoche and many other great tulkus of the Drukpa Lineage. Thereafter, Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche made a special visit to Nepal to pass on the entire Khampa Drukpa Lineage to the present Gyalwa Dokhampa Jigme Pema Nyinjadh and many other great tulkus and khenpos there.

In 1993, Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche also gave the complete empowerments of the Drukpa Lineage to the local tulkus in Nangchen. About 51 tulkus and 1600 monks and nuns were present to receive the empowerments and oral transmissions. In this way, Rinpoche became the main lineage master of the Khampa Drukpa tradition for all the Drukpa tulkus. Thereafter, Rinpoche went to Bhutan and exchanged initiations with His Holiness Je Khenpo, Jigme Chodrak Rinpoche, Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche and many other enlightened masters, thus becoming a representative of the Drukpa Lineage.

Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche also took responsibility for restoring Tsechu Gompa, and at the same time collecting, correcting and editing all the Drukpa teachings, Tantras and practices.

Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche passed away in July 2007, in Nangchen, Eastern Tibet, leaving behind a letter with Paljor Lhundrub, a monk in retreat, and this was only to be read in the public when the 9th Drukpa Choegon Rinpoche Thutop Chokyi Wangchuk and the 3rd Drubwang Tsoknyi Rinpoche were present. In March 2010, after Drukpa Choegon Rinpoche completed a one-month retreat, he passed a personal letter to Drubwang Tsoknyi Rinpoche to bring with him in his visit to Tsechu Gompa, to be read in the public together with the letter written by the late Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche. Both letters described clearly that Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche would take rebirth as the youngest son of his most illustrious disciple and nephew, His Eminence Trulshik Satrul Rinpoche. Drubwang Tsoknyi Rinpoche performed a traditional washing and clothe changing ceremony.

Clearly the birth of Pema Chogyal, the youngest son of Trulshik Satrul Rinpoche, was not a common incident. In September 2009, a fire had broken out at Yushu Hospital, where everyone had to be evacuated, except those in a delivery room where Satrul Rinpoche’s wife was giving birth. As the baby boy was born, a young girl of six or seven years old appeared at the delivery room and offered a flower to the parents, saying, “This is a gift for my little brother.” Soon after, she was no where to be found. At around the same time, all the water at the late Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche’s residence had mysteriously turned into milk.

Even as an infant, Pema Chogyal displayed unusual calmness and ability to stay mindful. He was matured, like an adult in disguise. He would often point to the photo of his predecessor saying, “That’s me when I was old,” and would only stay intimate with his father, not anyone else. He would also point at the late Rinpoche’s car saying, “This is my car,” and refusing to part with the car.

When the letter was read, many were not surprised. His Eminence Trulshik Satrul Rinpoche had received the unbroken lineage directly from his very own uncle and teacher, His Eminence Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche, and the lineage would now gradually be returned to the present Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche. His reincarnation was recognized by His Holiness the Gyalwang Drukpa, His Eminence Drukpa Choegon Rinpoche and His Eminence Drubwang Tsoknyi Rinpoche. His Eminence Drukpa Choegon Rinpoche had visited in Nangchen specially to give refuge vows, following the tradition of the past.

On 10th September 2015, Pema Chogyal will be officially enthroned as the 9th Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche, continuing his journey as a great Bodhisattva in benefit of the Drukpa Lineage and all sentient beings.


About Altitude Sickness

Source:  "Non-Physician Altitude Tutorial"

As Nangchen is a land of high passes, most foreign visitors are strongly advised to acclimatize. Symptons of Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) may occur, depending on individual visitor's physical health conditions; people who smoke and drink excessively would normally have more difficulties. AMS symptons are: loss of appetite, nausea or vomiting; fatigue or weakness; dizziness or light-headedness; difficulty in sleeping. AMS has been likened to a bad hangover, or worse. However, because the symptoms of mild AMS can be somewhat vague, a useful rule-of-thumb is: if you feel unwell at altitude, it is altitude sickness unless there is another obvious explanation (such as diarrhea).

Read moreAbout Altitude Sickness


Places of Interest

There are countless places of interest between Xining and Nangchen, in fact in the entire Eastern Tibet of Amdo and Kham. The main places are briefly mentioned for your reference.

XINING (Ziling 2275m)

Xining is the only large city in Qinghai and is the capital of the province. It has been a military garrison and trading center since the 16th century. The population of Xining is mostly Muslim (25%), Chinese, Mongolian, and very few Tibetans live in the town. However, it has become an important center for Tibetan Studies. The city developed through trade between China and Persia, linking with the famous Silk Road to the north. Buddhist masters such as Fa Xian passed this way en-route to India.

26km southwest of Xining, about 40 minutes' bus ride, is the county of Huangzhong (Tib. Rushar), where Kumbum Jampaling or Ta-er Si in Chinese, one of the greatest monasteries of Tibet is located. Kumbum Jampaling Monastery, covering 41 hectares in total area, was founded in 1560 to commemorate the birthplace of Tsongkhapa by Rinchen Tsondru Gyaltsen. The monastery was built around the tree that marked Tsongkhapa's actual birthplace, where his mother, Shingza Acho, had constructed a stupa (kumbum) in 1379.

QINGHAI LAKE (Tso-ngon 3205m)

Qinghai Lake, known as Tso-Ngon in Tibetan and Kokonor in Mongolian, is the largest salt water lake on the Tibetan Plateau, renowned for its breathtaking scenery and thriving bird sanctuary for cormorants, bar-headed geese, black-necked cranes, etc.

YUSHU (Jyekundo 3700m)

During the Tang Dynasty, Yushu was part of the ancient Tang-Tibet trade route from Chang'an (the present day Xi'an, the capital of Tang Dynasty) to Lhasa, Tibet. Yushu prefecture or Jyekundo was named after the town's illustrious hill-top monastery, Jyekundo Dondrubling. The monastery was constructed on the site blessed by the great Sakyapa master, Drogon Choygal Phagpa, who taught here while he was on his way to Mongolia.

About 20km south of Yushu is the famed Bida gorge, surrounded by four sacred peaks. There are rock inscriptions, some of which were self-arisen. According to legend, after King Songtsen Gampo received Princess Wencheng, they stayed here for a month before continuing southwest towards Lhasa. Princess Wencheng had the craftsmen accompanying her carved nine images with Buddha Vairocana as the central figure, flanked by eight Bodhisattvas. The statue of Vairocana apparently contains the relics of Buddha Kashyapa and the remains of Princess Wencheng's deceased child.

Subsequently when Princess Jincheng (the mother of King Trisong Deutsan) passed through in 710 AD, she commissioned a shrine hall to be constructed and this was expanded in 730 AD. This temple was traditionally maintained by the Drikung Lineage, but it is currently in the care of the neighboring Karma Kagyu's Thrangu Monastery.

On 14 April 2010, an earthquake struck the Yushu prefecture, registering a magnitude of 6.9. Many of the monasteries and historical monuments were destroyed and restoration is underway.

NANGQIAN (Nangchen between 3500 to 4000m)

There are over 30 monasteries and their branches, affiliated with the Drukpa Lineage, in Nangchen. Among them, His Eminence the Eighth Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche's Tshechu Monastery is the most revered. His Eminence the Eighth Satrul Rinpoche's Trulshik Monastery and His Eminence Jamme Choesin and His Eminence Jamme Lhamchok Rinopches' Jamme Monastery are also very important Drukpa monasteries in Nangchen. The famed Gechak Nunnery and its branches are also located here. This nunnery and its branches belong to Drubwang Tsoknyi Rinpoche of the Drukpa Lineage and about less than a century ago, in its hey day, had over 3000 yoginis spending their entire life in strict retreat.

About the holy mountains related to the Drukpa Lineage

In the Tibetan Himalayas, there are six important mountains "discovered" and consecrated by great masters of the Drukpa Lineage. Among them, four are located in Nangchen, one is the famed Mount Kailash where Gotsangpa charted the route for circumambulation of the Mountain and the Lakes and started the tradition of circumambulation, and the other one is Tsari in southern Tibet, located very close to Druk Sangag Choeling Monastery. It was the First Gyalwang Drukpa Tsangpa Gyare who discovered part of the holy pilgrimage site of Tsari, a powerful palce sacred to Chakrasamvara. At this unusual site, he personally saw his tutelary deity Chakrasamvara who prophesized that he would be the future Buddha Möepa. According to the secret instructions of the dakinis, he also made accessible many hidden treasures of Dharma (terma) in southern Tibet.

The four holy mountains of the Drukpa Lineage in Nangchen are:

  • Sarma Yang Dzong (gsar.ma.yang.rdzong) - located near Trulshik Monastery, discovered by the Tenth Gyalwang Drukpa and Choegyal Dorje.
  • Zi Gyal (gzi.rgyal) - located at the border of Qinghai and Tibet Autonomous Region, discovered by the Third Khamtrul Rinpoche Ngawang Kunga Tenzin
  • Pa Gyal (pa.rgyal) - located near Tsechu Monastery, discovered by the Third Khamtrul Rinpoche Ngawang Kunga Tenzin
  • La Dzo (bla.rdzo) - located near Tsechu Monastery, discovered by the Six Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche and the First Drubwang Tsoknyi

Climate Information

Xining

Average Data

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Average High 
(° F)

32/36

38/41

48/52

59/62

66/70

71/75

74/78

73/77

64/68

55/59

44/47

34/38

Average High 
(° C)

0/2

3/5

9/11

15/17

19/21

22/24

24/26

23/25

18/20

13/15

6/8

1/3

Average Low 
(° F)

4/8

11/14

23/26

33/36

41/44

47/50

51/55

50/54

44/47

33/36

19/23

8/11

Average Low 
(° C)

-16/-14

-12/-10

-5/-3

0/2

5/7

8/10

11/13

10/12

6/8

1/3

-7/-5

-14/-12

Rain (in)

<0.1

<0..1

0.2/0.3

0.8/0.9

1.6/1.7

2.0/2.1

3.1/3.2

3.2/3..3

2.2/2.3

0.9/1.0

0.1/0.2

<0.1

Rain (mm)

<5

<5

5/10

20/25

40/45

50/55

80/85

80/85

55/60

20/25

<5

<5

Yushu

Average Data

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Average High 
(° F)

36

40

47

54

60

65

68

68

63

54

45

38

Average High 
(° C)

2

4

8

12

16

18

20

20

17

12

7

3

Average Low 
(° F)

6

12

21

28

35

42

45

44

39

29

16

7

Average Low 
(° C)

-15

-11

-6

-2

2

6

7

6

4

-2

-9

-14

Rain (in)

0.11

0.15

0.24

0.52

1.6

2.97

2.65

2.61

2.19

0.85

0.1

0.09

Rain (mm)

2.9

3.8

6.2

13.3

40.6

75.4

67.4

66.3

55.5

21.7

2.5

2.3


Nangchen

Nangchen is located in the most southern part of Qinghai Province, neighboring the Tibetan Chamdo district. Total population stands as 60,415, and 98% of whom are Tibetans. It was formerly one of the five independent kingdoms of Eastern Tibet (Kham). Nangchen was spared from the onslaught of Gushri Khan's armies in the 17th century, mainly due to the nomadic lifestyle of its inhabitants and the harsh terrain quite inhospitable for settlement. There are only a few lower sheltered areas where cultivated fields are found. Against the backdrop of vast grasslands, dramatic limestone and sandstone cliffs and immaculate nature reserves, Nangchen is one of the most interesting and uncontaminated parts of Kham. The capital is at Sharda, 193km from Yushu (Jyekundo) via Ke La, 160km from Zurmang Dutsitil and 189km from Riwoche. There are about 78 monasteries in Nangchen, among them His Eminence Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche's Tshechu Monastery, His Eminence Satrul Rinpoche's Trulshik Monastery and Jamme Monastery which is managed by His Eminence Jamme Choesin and His Eminence Jamme Lhamchok Rinpoche are the more revered monastic institutions of the Drukpa Lineage.

Nangchen has been a stronghold of the Drukpa Lineage, due to the great influence of His Eminence the late Trulshik Adeu Rinpoche and his predecessors.

A BRIEF BACKGROUND OF KHAM (East Tibet)

For a relatively detail map of Kham, please click here

Amdo and Kham are generally considered to be the two Tibetan ‘provinces’ that made up Eastern Tibet. Amdo now forms a part of the three present-day provinces - the bulk of Qinghai, the southewestern edge of Gansu and the northernmost grassland of Sichuan. The western part of Kham consists more or less of what is now the Chamdo district of Tibetan Autonomous Region, the northern Kham lies in Qinghai's Yushu , its southernmost part is in Sichuan's Muli, and Yunnan's Dechen (Chi. Deqing or Zhongdian).

The region of Kham was traditionally known as chuzhi gangdruk, i.e. 'four rivers and six ranges'. The four rivers are: the Salween (Tib. Ngul-chu, Chi. Nu jiang), the Mekong (Tib. Da-chu, Chi. Lancang-jiang), the Yangtze (Tib. Dri-chu, Chi. Chang jiang), and the Yalong (Tib. Dza-chu/Nya-chu, Chi. Yalong-jiang). The six highland ranges which form the watersheds for these river systems are the Tsawagang range (5100-6700m) which includes the fabled snow peaks and glaciers of Mount Kawa Karpo (6702m) and which lies between the Salween and the Mekong; the Markhamgang range (Chi. Ningjing Shan 5100-5700m) which lies between the Mekong and the Yangtze; the Zelmogang range (4800-5400m) between the northern reaches of Yangtze and Yalong; the Poborgang range (4800-5600m) lies between the southern Yangtze and the lower Yalong; the Mardzagang (5100-5700m) occupying the area between the upper Yalong and the Yellow River; and lastly the Minyak Rabgang range (4800-7750m) including Mount Minyak Gangkar (7756m), the highest mountain in Kham, which lies between the lower Yalong and the Gyarong.

Since the disintegration of the Tibetan Yarlung Dynasty following the death of King Langdarma (the infamous king who destroyed Buddhism in the 10th century), for most part of their history, the kingdoms and tribal confederations of Kham, whether nomadic or sedentary, until the last century had aggressively maintained their independence from Lhasa and were always at war with each other. In recent history, the most important states in Kham were the five kingdoms of Chakla, Derge, Lingtsang, Nangchen and Lhathok, ruled by hereditary kings (Tib. gyalpo); the five agricultural states of Trehor Drango, Kangsar, Mazur, Trewo and Beri, ruled by hereditary chieftains (Tib. ponpo); the nomadic clans of Dzachuka, Nyarong, Sangen, Gonjo and Khyungpo, also ruled by hereditary chieftains; the southern states of Batang, Litang, Markham, Tsawarong and Powo, governed by Lhasa-appointed regents; and the western states of Chamdo, Drayab, Riwoche, Gyarong and Mili, governed by aristocratic lamas.

Today, the 47 counties of Kham are included in the four provinces, namely Tibet Autonomous Region, Yunnan, Qinghai and Sichuan.

There are many sacred sites in Kham, blessed by Padmasambhava who concealed many terma teachings in many places, particularly in the great twenty-five power places, which have primary and secondary affinities with either Buddha's body, speech, mind, attributes or activities. A few of them are in Nangchen - Khala Rongo (secondary site for Buddha's attributes); Nabun Dzong (secondary site for Buddha's mind); and Khandro Bundzong in lower Nangchen (secondary site for Buddha's attributes).

The renowned Khampagar Monastery, abode of the successive reincarnations of Kyabje Khamtrul Rinpoches, is located in Lhathok (Chi. Latuo), one of the five formerly independent kingdoms of Kham, presently within the Chamdo prefecture. Khampagar Monastery, also known as Phuntsok Chokhor Ling, was founded by the Third Khamtrul Rinpoche Ngawang Kunga Tenzin (1680 - 1728), under the patronage of the local king Og Lhathok. From here, the Drukpa Lineage flourished. Tshechu Monastery and its various branches are actually branches of Khampagar Monastery.

The people of Kham, or Khampa, are very different from other Tibetans, not only by their robust physique, colorful dress and braided coiffure, but also their dialects and social customs.


Register for Nangchen 2015

Contact

DRUKPA PUBLICATIONS PVT. LTD.

D301 Sushant Arcade, Sushant Lok-1
Gurgaon 122001, India

T | +91 124 4115234
E | info@drukpa.com

Copyright © 2015 Drukpa Publications Pvt. Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Drukpa Publications Pvt. Ltd. is the official publishing arm of the Drukpa Order.